Shuckin’, Crackin’, and Peelin’ – Let’s Dish Shellfish!

shellfish

Our customers are always asking about seafood. So we wanted to share some settings for turning out perfect, tender-firm shellfish from a CVap®.

The delicate nature of shellfish requires extra care and attention during the cooking process. It is easy to overcook and sabotage the flavor and texture of your favorite mussel or clam. CVap is excellent for cooking shellfish because you have precise control over time and temperature. Below are some suggested settings for a variety of delicious crustaceans. 

  1. Select an ingredient and target temperature from the table below.
  2. Set CVap Vapor and Air to the same temperature. Legacy models will be set to temperature and have a zero differential.
  3. Prep shellfish as preferred* and then place in CVap for recommended temp and times.
shellfish
Shellfish Preparation Vapor/Air Time
Clams or Cockles
Blanched and Shucked
133° -135°
2 hours
Lobster Claws
Shelled
140°-154°
2 hours
Lobster Tails
Shelled
129°-145°
2 hours
Mussels
Blanched and Shucked
146°-149°
2 hours
Oysters
Shucked
118°-126°
2 hours
Razor Clams
Blanched and Shucked
140°-146°
2 hours
Scallops
Whole
122°-129°
2 hours
Shrimp (Prawns)
Peeled
140°-165°
2 hours

*Note that clams, cockles, mussels and razor clams should be par blanched in boiling water for two minutes and then removed from shells. Reserve shells if you prefer to serve the finished product in them.

For a different riff on cooking with clams, check out this recipe from Michelle Bernstein, Chef/Owner of Michy’s in Miami: Pork Belly with Sake Braised Clams, Bok Choy, and Shitakes, click here.

Got a favorite shellfish dish to share? We’d love to hear from you!

CVap® Operators Groups

Share your recipes on Facebook or Linked In. These groups are all about Winston CVap Technology.  Sharing settings, recipes, and tips on how to utilize CVap in your kitchen. 

CVap Sous Vide Shrimp with Butter Herb Sauce

sous vide shrimp

Today I’m sharing one of our favorite CVap sous vide recipes: Shrimp with Butter Herb Sauce.

sous vide shrimp

If you are looking for tender, perfectly cooked shrimp bathed in a light, buttery sauce with a bright, citrus-shallot flavor (with just a hint of thyme), you will really love this one. This might spark some menu ideas, since operators may be looking for lighter fair in the upcoming warm weather season.

There is virtually no limit to what you can cook in CVap using a sous vide preparation. Because of CVap equipment’s unique ability to create and maintain precise temperature environments, even the most delicate products – like shrimp or fish – will turn out beautifully every time.

Recipe: CVap Sous Vide Shrimp with Butter Herb Sauce

Ingredients

  • 12 shrimp or prawns, peeled (16-20 count)
  • 1/4 cup clarified butter
  • 1 medium shallot minced
  • 1 1/2 tsp fresh thyme
  • 1/4 tsp fresh grated lemon zest

Instructions

  1. Place shrimp and all ingredients in preferred bag for vacuum sealing.
  2. Vacuum seal shrimp (prawns) in a single even layer.
  3. Set CVap Cook & Hold Oven to temperature of 125°F + 0°F differential. Allow to preheat for 30 minutes.
  4. Place vacuum sealed shrimp in CVap oven for a minimum of 20 minutes.
  5. Maintain in CVap until ready to serve. When ready to serve, cut open and place in serving dish or toss with delicate pasta, such as capellini.
Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 20 minutes We’d love to try your favorite recipes too, so please share them!
staging in cvap sous vide shrimp

Blushing CVap Lobster and Shrimp Pasta

We wanted to make something comforting yet elegant, an al dente linguine tossed in a velvety blush sauce. First we cooked lobster tails and shrimp in a CVap® Cook and Hold Oven. The flavor and texture of the shellfish added a level of decadence to the dish that made it truly special. Let’s deconstruct it!

lobster tails cooked in CVap
shrimp cooked in CVap

First, the shellfish. A CVap Cook and Hold Oven steamed the lobster tails 200 + 0 for about seven minutes, bringing them to the perfect temperature and texture for this dish. We staged the shrimp in the same oven, at 135 + 2 for about ten minutes. This made the shrimp nearly – but not quite – opaque, and held it there.

We cooked traditional linguine while the shellfish was steaming. The pasta cooked to al dente, tossed with a bit of olive oil, and held in a CVap Holding Cabinet at 140 + 0 until we were ready to plate.

On to the sauce! We combined olive oil, garlic, onion, San Marzano tomatoes, salt, pepper, and fresh basilto create a classic marinara.

After that, we added heavy cream to create a gorgeous blush sauce.

linguine tossed with EVO
Marinara sauce
blush sauce

Mix It All Together

We removed the lobster tail meat and reserved the shells, along with the shrimp shells, to make stock later.

Meanwhile we cubed and stirred some of the meat into the blush sauce. The rest was set aside to be added whole.

We coated a portion of pasta we’d been holding with the seafood/sauce mixture…

shellfish shells saved for stock
lobster meat added to blush sauce
lobster meat on cutting board
Adding blush sauce to pasta

Plate It

Gilded the lily by crowning it with the whole piece of shellfish, a bit more sauce, and a garnish of fresh basil.

The natural sweet flavor of the shellfish really came through, complimented nicely by the simple blush sauce. And the fresh basil added just the right amount of bright, yet peppery foil to the richness of the overall dish.

shimp added to lobster blush pasta
Lobster blush pasta - the finished dish