Exploration of Eggs: Creamiest Cheesecake Ever

baking cheesecake

Baking a picture-perfect and delicious cheesecake in a commercial kitchen can be a lot more difficult than people realize. You could have the perfect crust, a satiny-smooth filling, the best pan on the market, an appropriate bains marie, a great oven, mad skills… and still you wind up with those cracks in your custard!

As promised, I’m sharing a cheesecake recipe that I love, not only because it’s a tasty classic but also because it’s as fool-proof as the crème brûlée recipe I’ve already shared. I am again offering two methods: one is prepared in a CVap® Cook and Hold and the other in a CVap Retherm Oven.

Cheesecake Baked in a CVap Cook and Hold

Recipe/Process:

Crust: Mix 1½ cups of graham cracker crumbs with 3 Tbsp of sugar and 1/3 cup melted butter. Press into to bottom of a springform pan.

Filling: In a mixer, cream together 4 packages of cream cheese, 1 cup of sugar, and 1 tsp vanilla. Then mix in 4 eggs, one at a time. Mix on low until very few clumps are visible and be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl. Once the filling is finished, pour it over the crust.

  1. Set the unit to 200 + 0 Constant Cook and allow approximately 30 minutes when preheating the unit.
  2. Set the timer to 1:30
  3. Once the unit reads load, place the cheesecake in the unit and press start.
  4. After 1:30, the unit will read sell and the cheesecake has finished baking.
  5. Remove from oven and refrigerate (with the springform still in place) for at least 3 hours.
  6. After refrigeration, remove springform and slice for serving.

Cheesecake Baked in a CVap Retherm Oven

Recipe/Process:

Crust: Mix 1½ cups of graham cracker crumbs with 3 Tbsp of sugar and 1/3 cup melted butter. Press into to bottom of a springform pan.

Filling: In a mixer, cream together 4 packages of cream cheese, 1 cup of sugar, and 1 tsp vanilla. Then mix in 4 eggs, one at a time. Mix on low until very few clumps are visible and be sure to scrap the sides of the bowl. Once the filling is finished, pour it over the crust.

  1. Set the unit to Channel 1 and allow approximately 30 minutes when preheating the unit.
  2. Set the timer to 1:15
  3. Once the unit reads load, place the cheesecake in the unit and press start.
  4. After 1:15, the unit will read sell and the cheesecake has finished baking.
  5. Remove from oven and refrigerate (with the springform still in place) for at least 3 hours.
  6. After refrigeration, remove springform and slice for serving.
baking cheesecake cvap

There are 100 ways to cook an egg, and whether they are center of the plate or part of a cake or custard, there are so many ways to serve them. If you have a favorite cheesecake recipe or even want to share a past cheesecake calamity, please let us hear from you!

50 Shades of CVap

Have you ever had one of those experiences where your chance encounter far exceeded your expectation? The corporate chef of a chain restaurant asked me for a solution to increase the yield on their prime rib. Their average yield ranged from 75% to 82%. Increasing beef prices had them pretty concerned about profits. They were trying to avoid raising prices.

Pumping Up the Yield

The chef wanted to cook and hold the prime rib overnight because that created their lowest yield. While the chef seasoned the prime rib, I set our CVap® Cook and Hold Oven to 135°F Doneness, 7 Browning, High Yield ON and cook time of 5.5 hours. We loaded up the meat and left for the evening. The next morning we did the weigh-in. After a 5.5-hour cook and 11 hours holding, the pre-purged yield was 93.32%!

He invited The Boss to the cutting. After some delicate inspection, it was time to give it a try. “Wow, it’s almost too tender…wait I don’t think I meant to say that.” Needless to say, we had a good laugh.

increase yield on prime rib with cvap ovens

During our rather long meat-eating session, they talked about how they needed to find a way around water bathing, doming, and rotating cheesecakes in their convection oven. It was an operational headache. I was ready for dessert so I said, “let’s make some cheesecake.”

We baked two cheesecakes. One, as usual, was placed in their convection oven (water bathed, domed, and rotated). The other baked in the CVap oven at 200°F Doneness, 0 Browning, Constant Cook ON, and a three-hour cook time.

Testing CVap on Their Menu Favorites

The Cheesecake Challenge

The CVap cheesecake used no water bath, no doming, and did not need to be rotated. My guests described it as “very creamy; silky; a quarter taller; the crust is better; cuts cleaner.”

I expected them to be happy with the labor and operational savings, but my goal was not to create a better cheesecake for them. The convection oven cheesecake was great but was “drier on the tongue” and “a pain to make.”

Over the next few days we just got lost in the CVap oven. The chef prepped the items, and I set the oven. The days just flew by while we compared CVap to their current items.

cheesecake baked in CVap oven

Staged Steaks

(Setting: 135°F Doneness, 0 Browning, Constant Cook ON for 1 hour)

Time on their charbroiler: 2 minutes 45 seconds

steaks staged in cvap oven

Raw Steaks

(39°F from refrigerator)

Time on their charbroiler: 8 minutes (5 minutes and 15 seconds longer)

steaks cooked from raw with bullseye

Carrot Cake

(Setting: 170°F Doneness and 0 Browning, Constant Cook ON for 1 hour)

“You can taste the individual ingredients.”

carrot cake baked in cvap oven

Chocolate Cake

(Setting: 170°F Doneness and 0 Browning, Constant Cook ON for 1 hour)

“It’s just more like cake.”

chocolate cake baked in cvap oven

Tri-Tip

(Setting: 135°F Doneness and 5 Browning, High Yield ON for 5 ½ hours)

“You can cut it with a fork.”

How many shades of uses can you create with one oven – CVap?

increase yield tri-tip cooked in cvap oven